Striped Bass (Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence Population)

Morone saxatilis

SARA Status
No Status
NS
Special Concern
SC
Threatened
TH
Endangered
EN
Extirpated
EX

SARA Status

  • No Status NS
  • Special Concern SC
  • Threatened TH
  • Endangered EN
  • Extirpated EX
COSEWIC Status
Not at Risk
NR
Special Concern
SC
Threatened
TH
Endangered
EN
Extirpated
EX

COSEWIC Status

  • Not at Risk NR
  • Special Concern SC
  • Threatened TH
  • Endangered EN
  • Extirpated EX

Description

The Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) has the following characteristics:

  • A long, laterally compressed body with two separated dorsal fins, the first of which is spiny. It has seven or eight horizontal dark stripes along its sides.
  • It is dark olive green on the back with paler silvery sides and white on the belly.
  • Total length is up to 1 metre.

The Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence Striped bass population was historically exploited by commercial and sport fishing. It remains highly-prized by anglers and Aboriginal groups. Due to declines in abundance, the commercial fishery for Striped bass was closed in 1996 and the recreational and Aboriginal fisheries were closed in 2000.

Since 2011, this Striped bass population has achieved both its recovery limit and recovery target. 2013 saw the re-opening of a recreational fishery and Aboriginal fishery.

Habitat

This Striped bass population is widely distributed throughout the estuaries and coastal waters of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, particularly the east cost of New Brunswick, but also Prince Edward Island, part of the Gulf coast of Nova Scotia and part of the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec (Chaleur Bay).

Striped Bass distribution

The map represents the location of the three striped bass populations in Canada. The southern Gulf of St. Lawrence population is represented in orange and is located between the northern point of Nova Scotia and Cap Gaspé in Gaspésie Quebec. The green zone represents the distribution of the St Lawrence River population which is between Montréal and Rimouski. The purple zone is located between Rimouski and Cap Gaspé and it is an area to be determined. The yellow zone represents the Bay of Fundy population and it is between South of Nova Scotia to the east coast of United States.

Threats

Illegal harvest, bycatch in other fisheries, and disturbance of habitat could also affect the survival of the species.

Further Information

For more information visit the SARA Registry

Striped Bass (Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence Population)

Illustration: Jeffey Domm

Illustration: Jeffey Domm

Scientific name: Morone saxatilis
SARA Status: No Status
COSEWIC Status: Special Concern

Photo credit: Montreal Biodome

Photo credit: Montreal Biodome

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