Ocean Sciences and Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation

Ocean scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada undertake research and monitoring to provide advice on Canada's fisheries management, marine protected areas, species at risk, small craft harbours and maritime safety and security.

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Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program (ACCASP)

The Government of Canada created this program in order to integrate knowledge about climate change into the delivery of departmental programs. Watch short videos explaining the processes that regulate climate and how ocean changes occur.

Adaptation and Mitigation

In light of the serious and potentially irreversible consequences of climate change, consideration is being given to initiatives that may reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Impacts of emerging climate issues

Climate change is having a direct impact on our environment. Watch videos to learn about two emerging trends of concern to scientists: ocean acidification and hypoxia.

Predictions and scenarios

Ocean scientists rely on global and regional models to observe and forecast the impacts of climate change. Read about the climate models on Canada’s coasts and the collaborative groups involved in these projects.

Oceanographic activities

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is an important contributor to national and international oceanographic programs that provide data on global ocean processes for use in scenarios and climate models for risk management and advice on fisheries resources.

Ecosystem Research Initiatives (2007-2010)

DFO is committed to developing ecosystem-based approaches to managing human interactions with marine systems. Learn about seven initiatives established as pilot projects to enhance the capacity to provide scientific advice.

Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP)

Biodiversity monitoring contributes to this knowledge base by facilitating more rapid detection, communication, and response to the significant biodiversity-related trends and pressures affecting the circumpolar world.

What we are doing

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